Epistemology.

The definition of knowledge is a matter of ongoing debate among philosophers in the field of epistemology. Epistemology is the branch of philosophy concerned with the nature and scope of knowledge. It questions what knowledge is and how it can be acquired, and the extent to which knowledge pertinent to any given subject or entity can be acquired. The classical definition, described but not ultimately endorsed by Plato specifies that a statement must meet three criteria in order to be considered knowledge: it must be justified, true, and believed.

(‘S’ stands for the subject who has knowledge and ‘p’ for the proposition that is known)

“According to TK, knowledge that p is, at least approximately, justified true belief (JTB). False propositions cannot be known. Therefore, knowledge requires truth. A proposition S doesn’t even believe can’t be a proposition that S knows. Therefore, knowledge requires belief. Finally, S‘s being correct in believing that p might merely be a matter of luck. Therefore, knowledge requires a third element, traditionally identified as justification. Thus we arrive at a tripartite analysis of knowledge as JTB: S knows that p if and only if p is true and S is justified in believing that p. According to this analysis, the three conditions — truth, belief, and justification — are individually necessary and jointly sufficient for knowledge”.

Classical-Definition-of-Kno.svg

According to the theory that knowledge is justified true belief, in order to know that a given proposition is true, one must not only believe the relevant true proposition, but one must also have a good reason for doing so. One implication of this would be that no one would gain knowledge just by believing something that happened to be true. For example, an ill person with no medical training, but with a generally optimistic attitude, might believe that he will recover from his illness quickly. Nevertheless, even if this belief turned out to be true, the patient would not have known that he would get well since his belief lacked justification.

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/epistemology/

http://pespmc1.vub.ac.be/EPISTEMI.html

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1 Comment

  1. So, I have read this several times…I think I understand!
    Sorry for the delay, I also thought I had posted a response. I think you did a good job on this post, and I liked the graphics.
    RUBRIC:
    very informative; synthesizes learned content and constructs new meaning; well organized
    written in an interesting style and voice; words used are carefully chosen, and bring the content to life with sentence fluency; all words spelled correctly; few grammar errors; formatting makes the post more interesting and easier to read
    multiple pieces of multimedia adds new information or perspective to post; post is categorized and tagged

    Reply

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